Already Old And Getting Older

Decorations For My Apartment
Legget, California
May ’80

When I passed through Legget, a small California logging town,
I found a celebration going on. The townspeople were
having their annual Memorial Mountain Folk Festival. I decided to take
in some of the “doings,” so after I got my tent set up, and walked
back into town (about 1.5 miles), I enjoyed watching the ax throwing
contest and the saw competition. There were lots of booths selling
wares and crafts, and a beer booth that I visited on a number of
occasions. I spent a lot of time admiring the blond haired kid’s
pictures at his photography exhibit. A lot of his pictures, all nature pictures,
were taken in the same National Parks that I had visited. I was so impressed that I
decided to buy three photographs. The seller was more than obliging.
Together, we got the framed photographs ready to mail back to
Michigan. I would give the birch tree sunset one to my parents. The
other two I would hang on my apartment wall. I paid $14. for the birch
tree, and $60. more for the picture of a water droplet falling off a
pine bough and the panoramic shot of Hawaii’s Waimea Canyon. That
purchase was a little out of character for me, as it cut into my
travel money, but I wasn’t charged tax and when I left, the kid said,
“You just made my weekend.”

I didn’t need those photographs. I wanted them. For the first time in
my life I had a place to put them and that made me feel good. I had no
intention of abandoning my apartment. It was home. I had “roots” now,
and those photographs were not only beautiful, they were reminders of
the feelings I had had when I felt closest to nature—priceless
feelings. If you can’t spend money on meaningful things, what good is
it? Health is more important than money, and what is healthier than
the beauty and bounty of nature, or at least in my case, the memories
of it!

I’ve been giving my knee a rest for the last couple of days, but now
I’m getting ready to leave this campground. By providing hiker biker
campgrounds, California has been very good to me. If you walk or ride
a bike into a campground you only have to pay fifty cents per night.
California has always been on the leading edge of progressive
thinking; now I know why John Mayall is always coming back here. Well
its time to give my knee a whirl. Hopefully, it will hold up.

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About bwinwnbwi

About me: Marvin Gaye’s song, "What’s Going On" was playing on the jukebox when I went up to the counter and bought another cup of coffee. When I got back, the painting on the wall next to where I was sitting jumped out at me, the same way it had done many times before. On it was written a diatribe on creativity. It was the quote at the bottom, though, that brought me back to this seat time after time. The quote had to do with infinity; it went something like this: Think of yourself as being in that place where infinity comes together in a point; where the infinite past and the infinite future meet, where you are at right now. The quote was attributed to Hermann Hesse, but I didn’t remember reading it in any of the books that I had read by him, so I went out and bought Hesse’s last novel, Magister Ludi. I haven’t found the quote yet, but I haven't tired of looking for it either.
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7 Responses to Already Old And Getting Older

  1. Mèo Lười Việt says:

    People sacrifice health for showing-off things. They spend lots of money on cars, Iphone, fast fashion… but they forget the most wonderful things in the world. Beautiful and bountiful nature, diversity of ecology, fresh air… The most beautiful things in the world just can be felt by heart, not by eyes… Someone said that… Sounds fictitious?! But true.:D

    Sacrifice the everlasting values for fastidious values… It’s a irony of life!

  2. carlaat says:

    Love checking in with your diary entries. My husband traveled out west after college in the 1970s – he and his friends worked in the vegetable fields in CA to earn just enough money for camping and beer. He has so many great stories from that time, similar to the ones you’ve shared.

  3. The kids who asked us to move to Colorado, took us on several California tours, they were in school at the time–first the College of the Redwoods in Eureka and the Calpoly in SLO. I have a memory book in my head, on my computer and yes a few pictures we bought and framed scattered around the apartment. Thank you again for sharing and also for supporting my efforts.

  4. Mèo Lười Việt says:

    I like this title very much. 😀

  5. bwinwnbwi says:

    It’s a no brainer,–support the people who support you, which is what I try to do whenever I can. When people click the like on my blog I try to return the favor, even if I don’t understand the language they are posting in (I don’t speak Vietnamese Meo). I also tend to follow WordPress’s recommendations when it comes to spam–spam delete, not spam post. I’m not clear on pingbacks but I’m getting there. California, especially back in the day, was one of the most sought after destinations. It’s beauty is undeniable. I’m glad we can all share in these memories. Thanks for all the kind words. Take care.

  6. Mèo Lười Việt says:

    Hope that we can share memories of beautiful and bountiful nature someday. I like the blonde haired kid very much, too. He looks super super cute. I can’t help smiling contemplating his pics.

    • bwinwnbwi says:

      You won’t have to contemplate that super cute blond haired boy any longer. It seems California is a breeding ground for very handsome blond haired boys. In my next post I’ve captured one of those keepers on film. Take care.

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