Winging It–On Our Way To The Pacific Ocean


Bamfield

Pacific Ocean Bamfield Beach
Traveling British Columbia And Vancouver Island, Canada

The next day we had already bought and paid for two spare tires and some bulk oil when we found out that the Prince Rupert / Vancouver Island boat trip was going to be too expensive. We changed our plans. We headed south to the city of Vancouver. That night, when we camped in another campground (a free one), we met this dude who filled us in on the new Vancouver Island. It had been four years since I had been there, and, according to this camper, Long Beach had been turned into National Park. You had to pay to get in, and the entrance to the park (that long, winding, gravel road that I remembered) was now a paved highway. The guy told us about another beach. “If,” he said, “instead of following the road to Longbeach, you turn left at the fork in the road by the river, you will end up in Bamfield.” That sounded like a plan to us. He couldn’t tell us much about the place. The road to Bamfield was gravel, however, and he said, “West of Bamfield is the Pacific Ocean.” That was good enough for us.

The road south, just before Vancouver, followed a river through a
canyon. It was extremely scenic. When we got to the city, we boarded the ferry for the short ride over to the island. On the boat Mike met a chick and scored some weed at the same time. The chick was on her way to Longbeach. When we told her what we had heard about the place, she wanted to go with us instead. Mike and I didn’t have a problem with that.

The guy back at the campground was right; the sixty-two mile road to Bamfield was a restricted gravel road. The restricted part meant that logging trucks had the right of way. It was already late, and
everybody wanted to get to the ocean, so we decided to avoid the
logging trucks by traveling at night. The road I remembered from
traveling to Longbeach four years ago was a whole lot worse.
Unfortunately, though, by traveling at night, we missed all the
outstanding scenery.

It wasn’t hard to find the ocean, but I’m not sure we found Bamfield. After waking up the next morning, the ocean was exactly what we had hoped for, a huge stretch of deserted beach. The weather was gray and cold, not unusual for the coast. The surf was about one or two feet high and after a delicious breakfast of eggs and sausage (a promised special treat to ourselves), we walked down the beach and set up a more permanent camp. The afternoon brought with it a little sun, but the wind and dampness had everybody appreciating the fire.

We basically had the comforts of a log cabin. Our fire was situated in
a driftwood niche, which also doubled as makeshift walls. The
imaginative cook that Bev turned out to be was also appreciated. She was equally gifted as our mistress. She was an extremely
happy-go-lucky person. She wasn’t a beauty queen, though.

We stayed on the beach for two days. We would have stayed longer, but reality kept creeping into our humble abode. Actually it began the very first morning we arrived. We were more or less greeted by the Indian who told us we were camping on Indian Reservation Territory and had to pay for our truck to park on the reserve. “$1. per day,” he said. We had no problem with that, but later, when I walked up to the Indian’s house, another Indian held out his hand and said, “That will be $3. please.” It turned out to be “$4. a day for camping and parking on the reservation. I guess we could have kept paying, but the more we thought about it, the more we figured we were being ripped off (and the Indians weren’t friendly either), so we decided to leave the beach after two days. We left the same way we arrived, like thieves in the night. We saved a day’s fee that way.

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About bwinwnbwi

About me: Marvin Gaye’s song, "What’s Going On" was playing on the jukebox when I went up to the counter and bought another cup of coffee. When I got back, the painting on the wall next to where I was sitting jumped out at me, the same way it had done many times before. On it was written a diatribe on creativity. It was the quote at the bottom, though, that brought me back to this seat time after time. The quote had to do with infinity; it went something like this: Think of yourself as being in that place where infinity comes together in a point; where the infinite past and the infinite future meet, where you are at right now. The quote was attributed to Hermann Hesse, but I didn’t remember reading it in any of the books that I had read by him, so I went out and bought Hesse’s last novel, Magister Ludi. I haven’t found the quote yet, but I haven't tired of looking for it either.
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12 Responses to Winging It–On Our Way To The Pacific Ocean

  1. Mèo Lười Việt says:

    There’s a Vietnamese proverb like this “Con sâu làm rầu nồi canh”. It means some dirty ill-educated people brought shame upon our nation. They don’t care or have no idea about what is our nation’s pride. Of course when you are poor, its hard to keep your dignity. But that doesn’t mean it’s impossible. And when foreigners who come from rich countries look at us, Vietnamese, they think all of us are shameless and ready to kneel before them, ready to sell ourself for their money. That’s terribly sad!

  2. Mèo Lười Việt says:

    We stayed on the beach for two days. We would have stayed longer, but reality kept creeping into our humble abode. Actually it began the very first morning we arrived. We were more or less greeted by the Indian who told us we were camping on Indian Reservation Territory and had to pay for our truck to park on the reserve. “$1. per day,” he said. We had no problem with that, but later, when I walked up to the Indian’s house, another Indian held out his hand and said, “That will be $3. please.” It turned out to be “$4. a day for camping and parking on the reservation. I guess we could have kept paying, but the more we thought about it, the more we figured we were being ripped off (and the Indians weren’t friendly either), so we decided to leave the beach after two days. We left the same way we arrived, like thieves in the night. We saved a day’s fee that way.

    Thats the fact. But you, civilized people ripped them off first. Of course in much more polite and hidden ways. Because you consider you are 1st rate nation, highest race. They are just animals in your eyes, they even don’t deserve to be treated like human beings… That ‘s the way they get even with you. Haha!

    Surely i don’t support or agree with that rừng rú (barbarian) behavior at all! 😀

    • bwinwnbwi says:

      I don’t support barbarian behavior either! I blamed God’s in the beginning, but (bottom paragraph) I have a more nuanced view concerning blame today.

      “Where’s the fairness? Where’s the justice? Survival of the fittest you say. Believe me, if I was given just half a chance, I could have created a better world than this–Don’t give me that crap about freedom. Right over wrong, good over evil, that’s all bullshit too! Brains, brawn, and cleverness—determine good and evil. That’s the way it’s always been. Reinventing good and evil has always been the privilege of those who rule. Go ask the Indians! Blankets for land! Oh sure, smallpox infested blankets for the white man’s manifest destiny. The ‘good guys’ won—right!”

      • Mèo Lười Việt says:

        Believe me, if I was given just half a chance, I could have created a better world than this–Don’t give me that crap about freedom.

        If no one ever gives you a chance, why don’t try to make a chance yourself. And because you accept to be treated like a dog, you deserve to be treated that way!

        Thời thế tạo anh hùng, but sometimes anh hùng tạo thời thế!

        Right over wrong, good over evil, that’s all bullshit too! Brains, brawn, and cleverness—determine good and evil.

        Where is the heart? A human being without heart is just a killing machine or an animal in my eyes. Sorry! Even if he hides himself by lyrical words, he is nothing more than a cruel beast!

        Reinventing good and evil has always been the privilege of those who rule.

        Okie! I see that everyday, every hour how things happen around me. But that’s not always true. Look back upon our history, pls. Sorry, I don’t want to mention about the war between us at all, but who have won? But now you conquer us not by violence or technology… You won us by money and sweet words, by diplomacy, propaganda and global marketing… See how what’s called American Culture pervading this world… Is that good for the progress of human being when men and women fuck like animals in the heat, rulers exploit labors in the third world and devastate Mother Nature for their unquenchable blind greed?! And see where is the rate of divorce, murders, addicts highest in this world? Of course I see the bright side of your American Culture. I myself learn a lot from yours…

        If you believe in Kinh Dich, you will see that when evil comes to highest point, it must go down… If it goes on without anyone dare to stop it, the human race will come to extinction.

        About Indian, they have lost in their fight for freedom and keeping their homeland, at least they didn’t die in shame. Never! Fight to the end, even if you have to die for your cause!

        Just try my best! Let the rest 4 FATE!

  3. Mèo Lười Việt says:

    Oh! I have just seen a new post of yours. Why delete it off?! 😀

    • bwinwnbwi says:

      I had a hard time getting my post to show up on the postaday2011 blog page. I kept posting until it did show up and then I had to delete the previous ones.

  4. Mèo Lười Việt says:

    Nice song for a quite-a-nice day! 🙂

    I’ve been walking in the footsteps
    Of society’s lies
    I don’t like what I see no more
    Sometimes I wish that I was blind
    Sometimes I wait forever

    To stand out in the rain
    So no one sees me cryin’
    Trying to wash away the pain
    Mother father

    There’s things I’ve done I can’t erase
    Every night we fall from grace

    It’s hard with the world in yours face
    Trying to hold on, trying to hold on

    Faith: you know you’re gonna live thru the rain
    Lord you got to keep the faith
    Faith: don’t let your love turn to hate
    Right now we got to keep the faith
    Faith: now it’s not too late

  5. Mèo Lười Việt says:

    How old are you now? A 17 years old boy who refused to fight in the Vietnamese war before 1975. Sure! Certainly not. Bravo! You are so brave!! 😀

  6. bwinwnbwi says:

    I’m old, 63 in a week; probably older than those years suggest. I was 21 when I received my draft notice, in fact, if you want to know more, check out the very beginnings of this blog. In those early posts I recorded what I was thinking concerning the draft and what I ended up thinking when it came to the Vietnam war. (Oh, and as far as Connie’s boyfriend goes, he was a testosterone bleeding teenage jerk.) I really don’t know if I was brave, or just holding true to what I felt was right!

  7. Mèo Lười Việt says:

    I’m old too. I’m 72 in a month. And I was studying abroad in Vietnam war. But I tried to help my people by writing a lot in Foreign newspapers to get supportments of international friends! 🙂

  8. bwinwnbwi says:

    Nice to know you. There were a lot of good people, both here and abroad, who were trying to end that war. The Vietnam war is now recognized (by most I believe) to be a black mark on U.S. history.

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