Transience Teaches Patience

Glacier National Park
Mountain Camp
July 16

When I got packed and ready to leave the mountain for the second time
in as many days, I felt like I was leaving home. I was glad that I had
come to Glacier. I was glad that I had come to this exact spot. It was
impossible to remain dormant in the mountains; they’re to unforgiving
for that. You either learned what was taught, or you moved on. I had
learned a lot, and for that I was grateful. The lakes and streams had
taught me unity. The mountains had taught me transitory, regal
majesty. Here, emphasis was on the transitory. The mountain was
splitting apart and falling down (effects of weathering). I learned
from the rain and wind that Nature always wears a Janus face. She was
truly two-faced. As with everything else, the bad makes the good
better, and good makes the bad worse. Probably the most important
lesson I’d learned, however, was “patience.”

Cold, hungry, wet, miserable, or content, it was all self-explanatory
up here. It was just “me” under any and all conditions. The trees,
birds, fish, insects, mountains, clouds, snow…all were passive in
their independence, and in harmony as a group. Everything that was,
just was. When I left this place “It,” the Being of the place, would
go on. My being would go on too, except, down the mountain, it would
go on as part of civilization. It would go on as part of the illusion,
a being of a different color perhaps, but just as real. A long time
ago I had learned that deliberate and effective change was part of the
illusion. Those who thought they could change the world risked
becoming fools. In fact, I memorized a passage from the Upanishads
(books of commentaries on Hindu sacred writings) that referred to this
very thing. It went something like this: “Fools dwelling in darkness,
wise in their own conceit, puffed up with vain knowledge, staggering
to and fro, going round and round, like blind men lead by the blind.”

It’s all very quiet now.

About these ads

About bwinwnbwi

About me: Marvin Gaye’s song, "What’s Going On" was playing on the jukebox when I went up to the counter and bought another cup of coffee. When I got back, the painting on the wall next to where I was sitting jumped out at me, the same way it had done many times before. On it was written a diatribe on creativity. It was the quote at the bottom, though, that brought me back to this seat time after time. The quote had to do with infinity; it went something like this: Think of yourself as being in that place where infinity comes together in a point; where the infinite past and the infinite future meet, where you are at right now. The quote was attributed to Hermann Hesse, but I didn’t remember reading it in any of the books that I had read by him, so I went out and bought Hesse’s last novel, Magister Ludi. I haven’t found the quote yet, but I haven't tired of looking for it either.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Transience Teaches Patience

  1. Mèo Lười Việt says:

    Those who thought they could change the world risked
    becoming fools. In fact, I memorized a passage from the Upanishads
    (books of commentaries on Hindu sacred writings) that referred to this
    very thing. It went something like this: “Fools dwelling in darkness,
    wise in their own conceit, puffed up with vain knowledge, staggering
    to and fro, going round and round, like blind men lead by the blind.”

    Very interesting!… Wise in their own conceit, puffed up with vain knowledge, staggering to and fro, going around and around, LIKE BLIND MEN LEAD BY THE BLIND!

    Just live and learn what life teachs you or force you to learn. Let the rest 4 fate! :)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s